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Exclusive: Designing Single-handed Shortcuts for VR & AR

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For new computing technologies to realize their full potential they need new user interfaces. The most essential interactions in virtual spaces are grounded in direct physical manipulations like pinching and grabbing, as these are universally accessible. However, the team at Leap Motion has also investigated more exotic and exciting interface paradigms from arm HUDs and digital wearables, to deployable widgets containing buttons, sliders, and even 3D trackballs and color pickers.

Guest Article by Barrett Fox & Martin Schubert

Barrett is the Lead VR Interactive Engineer for Leap Motion. Through a mix of prototyping, tools and workflow building with a user driven feedback loop, Barrett has been pushing, prodding, lunging, and poking at the boundaries of computer interaction.

Martin is Lead Virtual Reality Designer and Evangelist for Leap Motion. He has created multiple experiences such as Weightless, Geometric, and Mirrors, and is currently exploring how to make the virtual feel more tangible.

Barrett and Martin are part of the elite Leap Motion team presenting substantive work in VR/AR UX in innovative and engaging ways.

As we move from casual VR applications to deeper and longer sessions, design priorities naturally shift toward productivity and ergonomics. One of the most critical areas of interaction design that comes up is mode switching and shortcuts.

Today we use keyboard shortcuts so often that it’s difficult to imagine using a computer without them. Ctrl+Z, Ctrl+C, and Ctrl+V are foundational to the efficiency of keyboard and mouse input. Most of you reading this have committed these to muscle memory.

In VR we’ve seen controller inputs adopt this shortcut paradigm relatively easily by remapping commands to buttons, triggers, trackpads, and analog sticks. To increase or decrease the brush size in Tilt Brush you swipe right or left on the trackpad of your brush hand.

But what happens when we think about one-handed rapid selections for bare-handed input? This requires a different kind of thinking, as we don’t have buttons or other mechanical inputs to lean on. In our previous work, we’ve mapped these kinds of commands to either world-space user interfaces (e.g. control panels) or wearable interfaces that use the palette paradigm, where one hand acts as a collection of options while the other acts as a picker.

But if we could mode switch or modify a currently active tool with just one hand instead of two we would see gains in speed, focus, and comfort that would add up over time. We could even design an embodied and spatial shortcut system without the need to look at our hands, freeing our gaze and increasing productivity further.

Direct Manipulation vs. Abstract Gestures

One way to activate a shortcut with a single hand would be to define an abstract gesture as a trigger. Essentially this would be a hand pose or a movement of a hand over time. This is an exception to a general rule at Leap Motion, where we typically favor direct physical manipulation of virtual objects as an interaction paradigm over using abstract gestures. There are a few reasons for this:

  • Abstract gestures are often ambiguous. How do we define an abstract gesture like ‘swipe up’ in three-dimensional space? When and where does a swipe begin or end? How quickly must it be completed? How many fingers must be involved?
  • Less abstract interactions reduce the learning curve for users. Everyone can tap into into a lifetime of experience with directly manipulating physical objects in the real world. Trying to teach a user specific movements so they can perform commands reliably is a significant challenge.
  • Shortcuts need to be quickly and easily accessible but hard to trigger accidentally. These design goals seem at odds! Ease of accessibility means expanding the range of valid poses/movements, but this makes us more likely to trigger the shortcut unintentionally.

To move beyond this issue, we decided that instead of using single gesture to trigger a shortcut, we would gate the action into two sequential stages.

The First Gateway: Palm Up

Our interaction design philosophy always looks to build on existing conventions and metaphors. One major precedent that we’ve set over time in our digital wearables explorations is that hand-mounted menus are triggered by rotating the palm to face the user.

This works well in segmenting interactions based on which direction your hands are facing. Palms turned away from yourself and toward the rest of the scene imply interaction with the external world. Palms turned toward yourself imply interactions in the near field with internal user interfaces. Palm direction seemed like a suitable first condition, acting as a gate between normal hand movement and a user’s intention to activate a shortcut.

The Second Gateway: Pinch

Now that your palm is facing yourself, we looked for a second action which would be easily triggered, well defined and deliberate. A pinch checks all these boxes:

  • It’s low-effort. Just move your index finger and thumb!
  • It’s well defined. You get self-haptic feedback when your fingers make contact, and the action can be defined and represented by the tracking system as reaching a minimum distance between tracked index and thumb tips.
  • It’s deliberate. You’re not likely to absent-mindedly pinch your fingers with your palm up.

Performing both of these actions, one after another, is both quick and easy, yet difficult to do unintentionally. This sequence seemed like a solid foundation for our single-handed shortcuts exploration. The next challenge was how we would afford the movement, or in other words, how someone would know that this is what they needed to do.

Thinking back on the benefits of direct manipulation versus abstract gestures we wondered if we could blend the two paradigms. By using a virtual object to guide a user through the interaction, could we make them feel like they were directly manipulating something while in fact performing an action closer to an abstract gesture?

The Powerball

Our solution was to create an object attached to the back of your hand which acts as a visual indicator of your progress through the interaction as well as a target for pinching. If your palm faces away, the object stays locked to the back of your hand. As your palm rotates toward yourself the object animates up off your hand towards a transform offset that is above but still relative to your hand.

Once your palm fully faces toward yourself and the object has animated to its end position, pinching the object – a direct manipulation – will trigger the shortcut. We dubbed this object the Powerball. After some experimentation, we had it animate into the pinch point (a constantly updating position defined as the midpoint between the index finger and thumb tips).

This blend of graphic affordance, pseudo-direct manipulation, gestural movement, and embodied action proved easy to learn and ripe with potential for extension. Now it was time to look at what kinds of shortcut interface systems would be ergonomic and reliably tracked from this palm-up-pinched-fingers position.

Continued on Page 2: Spatial Interface Selection »

The post Exclusive: Designing Single-handed Shortcuts for VR & AR appeared first on Road to VR.

Source: https://www.roadtovr.com/leap-motion-designing-single-handed-shortcuts-for-vr-ar/

Blockchain

Stellar Lumens Price Analysis: 28 January

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Disclaimer: The findings of the following analysis are the sole opinions of the writer and should not be taken as investment advice

The crypto-market has been in a state of consolidation for a while and many altcoin traders are moving to sell their digital assets across the board. Stellar Lumens [XLM] has been in a long, sustained period of consolidation too, with the same taking the form of a bearish market on the charts.

At the time of writing, XLM was priced at $0.2549, with the crypto leaning closer to its crucial support level.

Stellar Lumens 6-hour chart

Source: XLMUSD on TradingView

Stellar Lumens’ 6-hour chart highlighted the strong surge at the beginning of the year, one that pushed the crypto’s price to $0.4. However, it has been faltering since. In fact, the constant push and pull formed an important support level for the digital asset on the chart.

After breaching two important supports, XLM was close to breaching another important support at $0.2300, while giving shape to a descending triangle, a bearish signal.

Reasoning 

The descending triangle signaled the rise of bearishness in the market. Further, the 50 moving average underlined the downward trending value of XLM. If its value breaches the support level, the coin’s market might record yet another sellers’ wave.

Meanwhile, the Relative Strength Index bounced back from the oversold zone. There was a brief recovery effort at $0.2300, however, the buyers were unable to hold on to this level as the RSI once again pointed south. In a low momentum market, XLM’s price will face a difficult time building back its lost value.

Crucial levels to watch out for

Entry: $0.2505
Stop-Loss: $0.2681
Take-Profit: $0.2114
Risk-to-Reward: 2.22

Conclusion

The ongoing market trend has been painting a good picture for short traders. With an entry at $0.2505, the traders can take profit at $0.2114. XLM’s price will be moving towards yet another level of support at $0.2084, a level that is not a major support since it has not been tested more than once.

Source: https://ambcrypto.com/stellar-lumens-price-analysis-28-january

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As DeFi Grows, Do Institutional Investors See ETH as Store-of-Value?

  A lot of the discussion about Bitcoin over the last year has been about its establishment as a store-of-value. As institutional investors continue to take positions in Bitcoin–some even explicitly describing BTC as a “hedge against inflation”–the narrative is stronger than ever. Earlier this month, Coinbase published a report with an interesting finding: indeed, … Continued

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A lot of the discussion about Bitcoin over the last year has been about its establishment as a store-of-value. As institutional investors continue to take positions in Bitcoin–some even explicitly describing BTC as a “hedge against inflation”–the narrative is stronger than ever.

Earlier this month, Coinbase published a report with an interesting finding: indeed, the exchange’s institutional clients said that Bitcoin’s evolving role as a store of value was an important part of their reason for investing in it. However, Coinbase also noted that the same group of investors were starting to view another large-cap asset as a possible store of value: Ether (ETH), the native asset of the Ethereum network.

Indeed, “the case for owning Ethereum we hear most frequently from our clients is a combination of i) its evolving potential as a store of value, and ii) its status as a digital commodity that is required to power transactions on its network,” a summary of the year-end report explained.

“While our institutional clients predominantly bought Bitcoin in 2020, a growing number also took positions in Ethereum, the second-largest crypto asset by market capitalization,” the report said.

“Ethereum performed well against USD in 2020, outpacing Bitcoin to finish the year up 487% at $745.” Since then, the price of ETH has climbed even further: at press time, the price of ETH was ~$1,275; earlier in the year, ETH climbed as high as $1,470. According to data from Messar.io, ETH was up more than 75 percent since the start of the year, while the price of BTC was up just under 6 percent.

Could institutional investors be the source of some of these gains? And if institutional investors are really seeing Ether as a store-of-value asset? And, if so, what are the implications that this may have for the Ethereum network and the DeFi space as a whole?

BTC is fundamentally different than ETH

Let’s back up for a moment: while both Bitcoin (BTC) and Ether may be perceived by some investors as stores-of-value, there are some very important differences between the two assets. For example, Bitcoin’s value is its functionality; in the earlier days of Bitcoin, Bitcoin was discussed as a transactional network–a “digital cash.” However, as the network has grown, scalability issues have caused the network to be seen as a sort of “digital gold”: a store of value.

Ether, on the other hand, has multi-faceted functionality. Sure, ETH tokens hold value, but the tokens are also used in practical ways on the Ethereum network. While other tokens (called ERC20 tokens) have also been launched on the Ethereum network, ETH is the currency in which transactional fees on the network must be paid. As such, ETH is the “facilitator” of the network: it is the currency that allows transactions, smart contracts, and decentralized applications (dApps) to operate.

Doug Schwenk, Chairman of DAR (Digital Asset Research), explained to Finance Magnates that therefore, “perhaps in the short term, ETH may be seen as a store-of-value,” but over the longer-term, “it’s correctly seen as valuable for its utility.”

Doug Schwenk, Chairman and chief executive of Digital Assets Research (DAR).

The growth of the DeFi ecosystem is pushing Ether up

Mr. Schwenk also explained that there are other fundamental differences between the two assets that make their status as stores-of-value quite different over the long term: “Bitcoin, similar to gold, has a limited supply, which contributes to the store-of-value narrative,” he said.

“ETH, on the other hand, does not have a fixed cap. The price of ETH may be more directly related to its utility to process transactions which are used in many applications,” including a number of decentralized finance (DeFi) dApps.

Token-based fundraising advisor Eloisa Marchesoni explained to Finance Magnates that “decentralized finance” is a set of decentralized platforms that provide traditional financial services, including loans and investments.

However, the DeFi ecosystem is still in its very early stages: “[DeFi is] a new financial ‘wild-west’ that takes place largely on Ethereum and which according to some experts could give rise to a new ‘digital gold rush’ similar to the ICO boom of late 2017,” Ms. Marchesoni explained.

Unlike the ICO era, however, analysts see much more potential in many DeFi projects to continue to grow for years to come: Doug Schwenk told Finance Magnates that “as more mature applications are built on Ethereum that provide greater value to the end-user, the value of the asset should naturally increase.”

“If ETH grows, the price of tokens in the Ethereum ecosystem also increases.”

Therefore, while Ether may not be a store-of-value in the same way that Bitcoin is, ETH does have a kind of correlative-value relationship with the decentralized finance ecosystem. As the number of applications build on top of the Ethereum network continues to grow, so too does the amount of capital flowing through that ecosystem. As more transactions take place on the network, the greater the usage of Ether.

Indeed, “DeFi tokens’ core movement takes place on decentralized exchanges like Uniswap, Mooniswap, Sushiswap, et cetera,” Doug Schwenk told Finance Magnates. “The main trading pair to which these tokens are traded is respectively ETH. As a result, if ETH grows, the price of tokens in the Ethereum ecosystem also increases.”

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“It’s not directly correlated, but it is the leading driving factor besides the hype of DeFi,” he added.

However, while the growth of the DeFi ecosystem may have increased Ether’s value in the short-term, Eloisa Marchesoni also explained to Finance Magnates that while “the high demand for Ether in DeFi applications is expected to have a long-term impact on the price of Ethereum,” ETH’s price is still subject to market sentiment in the short-term.

“Ethereum prices are currently following the current market sentiment and have fallen by 17.7% over the past seven days,” Ms. Marchesoni explained.

The Transition to Eth2.0

While this growth of Ethereum’s DeFi ecosystem has caused some repeated instances of slow transaction speeds and high transaction fees, the team responsible for developing the technology behind the Ethereum network has recently led Ethereum community through the first step toward Eth2.0, a software upgrade that is slated to fix some of the network’s scalability problems.

This could have very important implications for the future of the Ethereum network–and for the price of Ether.

Eloisa Marchesoni explained to Finance Magnates that “without going into the very complicated technical details” regarding the transition to Eth2.0, “it is enough to know that thanks to a mechanism known as sharding and the transition to proof-of-stake, it will be possible to process thousands of transactions per second consuming very little energy.”

Eloisa Marchesoni, Token-based fundraising advisor.

“These innovations will allow Ethereum to solve the age-old ‘blockchain trilemma,’ which states that it’s not possible to have security, speed and decentralization at the same time,” she said. “Ethereum, if all goes well, will therefore be efficient and sustainable.”

Ms. Marchesoni also explained that the developments toward Eth2.0 seem to have been embraced by investors: “the value of Ethereum’s cryptocurrency has more than quadrupled from its 2018 lows,” she said. Additionally, the amount of Ether currently staked in the Eth2.0 smart contract has climbed to more than $3 billion since December 1st, when Eth2.0’s so-called “beacon chain” was launched.

Additionally, Ms. Marchesoni pointed out that since the launch of the beacon chain, “[the number of transactions on] the Ethereum blockchain has surpassed that of bitcoin,” which was previously the most-used cryptocurrency network.

via BitInfoCharts

Therefore, Ether isn’t a store of value in the same way that Bitcoin is. However, that doesn’t mean that it isn’t valuable, and won’t continue to grow over the long-term.

Konstantin Boyko-Romanovsky, CEO and Founder of Allnodes, told Finance Magnates that he believes that “sooner or later, the majority of institutional investors will turn their attention to Ethereum, which, as we know, has many more applications than the number one currency, [Bitcoin].”

“This, of course, creates positive expectations for investors in terms of possible earnings. Currently, there are no discussions in the crypto community on ‘flippening’, a term used to describe the possibility of Ethereum surpassing Bitcoin as the leading cryptocurrency. However the fact remains the same, Ethereum is currently more vigorous than ever.”

Konstantin Boyko-Romanovsky, CEO and Founder of Allnodes.

Growth of the DeFi ecosystem is positive for both BTC and ETH

Interestingly, though, is the fact that the growth of the DeFi ecosystem isn’t only good for the growth of Ether and the Ethereum network–it’s also good for Bitcoin.

Indeed, “BTC has certainly been an important part of the DeFi ecosystem, primarily as collateral,” Doug Schwenk told Finance Magnates. In other words, the more that DeFi grows, the more Bitcoin that is used within DeFi. For example, at press time, the total value locked (TVL) in the DeFi ecosystem had reached $25.49 billion; $5.02 billion of DeFi’s TVL is comprised of Bitcoin.

However, as Finance Magnates previously reported, “the amount of Bitcoin that is currently being used in the DeFi ecosystem may not be enough to have a significant effect on the price of Bitcoin. Currently, the amount of Bitcoin used in the DeFi ecosystem is just under 1% of Bitcoin’s circulating supply.”

Additionally, Doug Schwenk believes that a healthy Bitcoin price could also feed into further growth of the DeFi ecosystem: “if the BTC price continues to grow and with time becomes more stable, it could facilitate a robust DeFi ecosystem,” he explained. “The DeFi ecosystem will ultimately be held back if there is not an asset of sufficient market cap that can be seen as reliable collateral.”

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Blockchain

As DeFi Grows, Do Institutional Investors See ETH as Store-of-Value?

  A lot of the discussion about Bitcoin over the last year has been about its establishment as a store-of-value. As institutional investors continue to take positions in Bitcoin–some even explicitly describing BTC as a “hedge against inflation”–the narrative is stronger than ever. Earlier this month, Coinbase published a report with an interesting finding: indeed, … Continued

Avatar

Published

on

A lot of the discussion about Bitcoin over the last year has been about its establishment as a store-of-value. As institutional investors continue to take positions in Bitcoin–some even explicitly describing BTC as a “hedge against inflation”–the narrative is stronger than ever.

Earlier this month, Coinbase published a report with an interesting finding: indeed, the exchange’s institutional clients said that Bitcoin’s evolving role as a store of value was an important part of their reason for investing in it. However, Coinbase also noted that the same group of investors were starting to view another large-cap asset as a possible store of value: Ether (ETH), the native asset of the Ethereum network.

Indeed, “the case for owning Ethereum we hear most frequently from our clients is a combination of i) its evolving potential as a store of value, and ii) its status as a digital commodity that is required to power transactions on its network,” a summary of the year-end report explained.

“While our institutional clients predominantly bought Bitcoin in 2020, a growing number also took positions in Ethereum, the second-largest crypto asset by market capitalization,” the report said.

“Ethereum performed well against USD in 2020, outpacing Bitcoin to finish the year up 487% at $745.” Since then, the price of ETH has climbed even further: at press time, the price of ETH was ~$1,275; earlier in the year, ETH climbed as high as $1,470. According to data from Messar.io, ETH was up more than 75 percent since the start of the year, while the price of BTC was up just under 6 percent.

Could institutional investors be the source of some of these gains? And if institutional investors are really seeing Ether as a store-of-value asset? And, if so, what are the implications that this may have for the Ethereum network and the DeFi space as a whole?

BTC is fundamentally different than ETH

Let’s back up for a moment: while both Bitcoin (BTC) and Ether may be perceived by some investors as stores-of-value, there are some very important differences between the two assets. For example, Bitcoin’s value is its functionality; in the earlier days of Bitcoin, Bitcoin was discussed as a transactional network–a “digital cash.” However, as the network has grown, scalability issues have caused the network to be seen as a sort of “digital gold”: a store of value.

Ether, on the other hand, has multi-faceted functionality. Sure, ETH tokens hold value, but the tokens are also used in practical ways on the Ethereum network. While other tokens (called ERC20 tokens) have also been launched on the Ethereum network, ETH is the currency in which transactional fees on the network must be paid. As such, ETH is the “facilitator” of the network: it is the currency that allows transactions, smart contracts, and decentralized applications (dApps) to operate.

Doug Schwenk, Chairman of DAR (Digital Asset Research), explained to Finance Magnates that therefore, “perhaps in the short term, ETH may be seen as a store-of-value,” but over the longer-term, “it’s correctly seen as valuable for its utility.”

Doug Schwenk, Chairman and chief executive of Digital Assets Research (DAR).

The growth of the DeFi ecosystem is pushing Ether up

Mr. Schwenk also explained that there are other fundamental differences between the two assets that make their status as stores-of-value quite different over the long term: “Bitcoin, similar to gold, has a limited supply, which contributes to the store-of-value narrative,” he said.

“ETH, on the other hand, does not have a fixed cap. The price of ETH may be more directly related to its utility to process transactions which are used in many applications,” including a number of decentralized finance (DeFi) dApps.

Token-based fundraising advisor Eloisa Marchesoni explained to Finance Magnates that “decentralized finance” is a set of decentralized platforms that provide traditional financial services, including loans and investments.

However, the DeFi ecosystem is still in its very early stages: “[DeFi is] a new financial ‘wild-west’ that takes place largely on Ethereum and which according to some experts could give rise to a new ‘digital gold rush’ similar to the ICO boom of late 2017,” Ms. Marchesoni explained.

Unlike the ICO era, however, analysts see much more potential in many DeFi projects to continue to grow for years to come: Doug Schwenk told Finance Magnates that “as more mature applications are built on Ethereum that provide greater value to the end-user, the value of the asset should naturally increase.”

“If ETH grows, the price of tokens in the Ethereum ecosystem also increases.”

Therefore, while Ether may not be a store-of-value in the same way that Bitcoin is, ETH does have a kind of correlative-value relationship with the decentralized finance ecosystem. As the number of applications build on top of the Ethereum network continues to grow, so too does the amount of capital flowing through that ecosystem. As more transactions take place on the network, the greater the usage of Ether.

Indeed, “DeFi tokens’ core movement takes place on decentralized exchanges like Uniswap, Mooniswap, Sushiswap, et cetera,” Doug Schwenk told Finance Magnates. “The main trading pair to which these tokens are traded is respectively ETH. As a result, if ETH grows, the price of tokens in the Ethereum ecosystem also increases.”

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“It’s not directly correlated, but it is the leading driving factor besides the hype of DeFi,” he added.

However, while the growth of the DeFi ecosystem may have increased Ether’s value in the short-term, Eloisa Marchesoni also explained to Finance Magnates that while “the high demand for Ether in DeFi applications is expected to have a long-term impact on the price of Ethereum,” ETH’s price is still subject to market sentiment in the short-term.

“Ethereum prices are currently following the current market sentiment and have fallen by 17.7% over the past seven days,” Ms. Marchesoni explained.

The Transition to Eth2.0

While this growth of Ethereum’s DeFi ecosystem has caused some repeated instances of slow transaction speeds and high transaction fees, the team responsible for developing the technology behind the Ethereum network has recently led Ethereum community through the first step toward Eth2.0, a software upgrade that is slated to fix some of the network’s scalability problems.

This could have very important implications for the future of the Ethereum network–and for the price of Ether.

Eloisa Marchesoni explained to Finance Magnates that “without going into the very complicated technical details” regarding the transition to Eth2.0, “it is enough to know that thanks to a mechanism known as sharding and the transition to proof-of-stake, it will be possible to process thousands of transactions per second consuming very little energy.”

Eloisa Marchesoni, Token-based fundraising advisor.

“These innovations will allow Ethereum to solve the age-old ‘blockchain trilemma,’ which states that it’s not possible to have security, speed and decentralization at the same time,” she said. “Ethereum, if all goes well, will therefore be efficient and sustainable.”

Ms. Marchesoni also explained that the developments toward Eth2.0 seem to have been embraced by investors: “the value of Ethereum’s cryptocurrency has more than quadrupled from its 2018 lows,” she said. Additionally, the amount of Ether currently staked in the Eth2.0 smart contract has climbed to more than $3 billion since December 1st, when Eth2.0’s so-called “beacon chain” was launched.

Additionally, Ms. Marchesoni pointed out that since the launch of the beacon chain, “[the number of transactions on] the Ethereum blockchain has surpassed that of bitcoin,” which was previously the most-used cryptocurrency network.

via BitInfoCharts

Therefore, Ether isn’t a store of value in the same way that Bitcoin is. However, that doesn’t mean that it isn’t valuable, and won’t continue to grow over the long-term.

Konstantin Boyko-Romanovsky, CEO and Founder of Allnodes, told Finance Magnates that he believes that “sooner or later, the majority of institutional investors will turn their attention to Ethereum, which, as we know, has many more applications than the number one currency, [Bitcoin].”

“This, of course, creates positive expectations for investors in terms of possible earnings. Currently, there are no discussions in the crypto community on ‘flippening’, a term used to describe the possibility of Ethereum surpassing Bitcoin as the leading cryptocurrency. However the fact remains the same, Ethereum is currently more vigorous than ever.”

Konstantin Boyko-Romanovsky, CEO and Founder of Allnodes.

Growth of the DeFi ecosystem is positive for both BTC and ETH

Interestingly, though, is the fact that the growth of the DeFi ecosystem isn’t only good for the growth of Ether and the Ethereum network–it’s also good for Bitcoin.

Indeed, “BTC has certainly been an important part of the DeFi ecosystem, primarily as collateral,” Doug Schwenk told Finance Magnates. In other words, the more that DeFi grows, the more Bitcoin that is used within DeFi. For example, at press time, the total value locked (TVL) in the DeFi ecosystem had reached $25.49 billion; $5.02 billion of DeFi’s TVL is comprised of Bitcoin.

However, as Finance Magnates previously reported, “the amount of Bitcoin that is currently being used in the DeFi ecosystem may not be enough to have a significant effect on the price of Bitcoin. Currently, the amount of Bitcoin used in the DeFi ecosystem is just under 1% of Bitcoin’s circulating supply.”

Additionally, Doug Schwenk believes that a healthy Bitcoin price could also feed into further growth of the DeFi ecosystem: “if the BTC price continues to grow and with time becomes more stable, it could facilitate a robust DeFi ecosystem,” he explained. “The DeFi ecosystem will ultimately be held back if there is not an asset of sufficient market cap that can be seen as reliable collateral.”

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